Art Making Art Thinking

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Tag: Perth Museum and Art Gallery

Super Moon – What would Galileo think?

a week on from the blood blue super full moon and  snow has fallen deep and soft in the night everything hidden and lying beneath this all resting against each other randomly it is not dry small flakes it is large wet flakes in clumps on the branches of trees and houses  the sky is blue grey no stars or moon this morning dark no hint of the sun rising behind the sidlaws to the south no robin sings toward the dawn no wind

I can play with our northern dog outside in her element where she would rather be all the time

I have been wondering what all the great thinkers of the past would make of our world now, what they may have achieved with the resources we have at their fingertips, does ease of access to our technologies for some of our societies make us intellectually lazy, does lack of access mean people think harder to solve problems or do they become worn down by life’s inequalities? Galileo’s life was intellectually hard, his support and enhancement of Copernicus’ theory was challenged and threatened by the Roman Catholic Church and his reasoned analysis of the Earth’s place in the Solar System meant imprisonment, yet he kept working and eventually was able to come home near the end of his life. Sometime in the early years of this century I looked at Galileo’s drawings of the phases of the Moon with close attention and seriously thought, for the first time, about what was actually involved in his process of moving his gaze through the telescope (the lenses ground by himself) at the Moon and recording what he saw when he drew the Moon. The drawings were published them in his book The Sidereal Messenger (1610), I had seen them before but I had not previously fully considered what these drawings actually are and what they meant for society then.

This thinking about thought is cyclical, like the Moon it moves out of sight then returns when I see or read something which reminds me, in this case the BBC’s programme about the Moon scheduled to take place on the same night (31 March 2018) as a Super Moon. What moved me was not only the images of the Moon, it was those of peoples’ reaction to this natural event, their excitement showed in the way they moved, how they spoke. . . all these people all around the world responding . . . this is as beautiful as the Moon itself. Throughout the programme the camera kept returning to an artwork made of the Moon and showing audiences’ reactions when they encountered it. Although this moon was not real people who came to see reacted in the same way as they would to the real one. The artist was not credited during the programme, I waited for the end credits to confirm who I thought it was. I have not seen the artwork itself, a Radio 4 programme had caught my interest and I was pleased to see that this moon looked like my imagining. The artist is Luke Jerram, have a look at his work on his website.

I think Galileo would have liked Luke’s Moon, and I think he would have liked all the technology  we use now to see the Moon, technology which can be traced back to him grinding lenses for his telescope so that he could look at the Moon. If you want to read about his life and its complexities then Dava Sobel’s (2009) book of his life is fascinating.

For the rest of February and into March I am BUSY. Writing my Final Research report for Creative Scotland and sorting out from the project what I’m going to show at Platform 2018, Culture Perth and Kinross’s yearly festival of the arts. http://www.culturepk.org.uk/

 

 

Art Times . . . I live Here . . . and I am out of my Studio

I spend so much of the time inside my studio and undoubtedly I sometimes use it as a refuge from the noise of our world. Most of us have hiding places from everyday demands and routines of work and it is uncomfortable to recognise that my own refuge is actually my work. My research project into the River Ericht has brought many personal challenges, not least meeting other people and clearly explaining what I am doing. The art of communication is precisely that, an art, and because much of my time is spent alone communicating with other people holds many complex layers and potential for misunderstanding.

There are so many people I have met in my work about the River Ericht since February and I am struck again by how genuinely giving and constructive they are with their memories and knowledge. Ideas for possible artworks are beginning to form and I have shared two or three of these with closer acquaintances,

And there is so much to do, the amount of relevant information I have already gathered is varied and vast. At the beginning of June I was introduced to The Blethers group in Blairgowrie and look forward  to going along and listening to more recollections in July. Last Thursday (14th June) I listenned to a talk in the Cateran Cafe given by Paul Adair (Perth Museum and Art Gallery) on the Laing Photographic Collection given to the archives by  D.Wilson Laing Photographers after they closed in Blairgowrie around 1993. The collection has been chosen by Cateran’s Common Wealth as part of the A Story of the Cateran Trail in 100 Objects exhibition which opens on 1st July in Alyth Museum. It was fascinating because portraits of our own children in 1992 (too recent for the purposes of the talk) were taken in the studio which was shown on the first slide and although I did not know any of the people in the photographs I recognised many of the locations. The extensive collection will soon be available to view online.

This weekend BRAN volunteers tidied up the grass and litter along the banks of the Riverside, this is hard work especially because PKC does not have the budget to commit to maintaining this resource. There are plenty of bins along the path and I don’t understand why people don’t use them, this is such a beautiful place for visitors to Blairgowrie and people who live here to relax and enjoy AND it’s only five minutes from the town centre AND Cargill’s Bistro‘s excellent scones OR Wellmeadow Cafe‘s tasty pancakes. Clare Damodaran from the Blairgowrie Advertiser came down and took some pictures of us before we all got messy and then interviewed Brian Smith, Graham Reid and myself about the Riverside Venture Group which I joined in April. Brian and Graham are working hard to rejuvenate the Riverside as an essential place to visit in Scotland given the town’s wealth of social and cultural history – they will welcome any ideas and people willing to get involved.

On Sunday I went along to the third of Leila Mayne’s Plant Study Walks along the Ericht and the first thing I saw on the freshly cut grass was a large empty plastic Co-op bag and various empty sandwich cartons and silver foil. ANYWAY!! Leila  knows so much about aspects of our relationship with our environment that Hazel and I become mentally stunned with her weight of knowledge. We learned about the health giving properties of  two types of Plantain, Plantago Lanceolata and Plantain- Plantaginaceae. Brilliant! Not only because I am learning about so many new plant properties but also because I get to spend most of the day outside by the River. It was an absolutely beautiful day.

On Saturday 24th I will be at Blairgowrie’s Community Market in the ABC tent should anyone want to come and see me drawing my surroundings in the Wellmeadow. And, if you would like to try outdoor drawing with me, then my July workshops are on the 21st and 22nd July, book on https://www.aileenmstackhouse.co.uk/courses.html   seven maximum – minimum four.