Art Making Art Thinking

Making art - ideas from anytime and anyplace

Tag: Roddy Mathieson

Master Caster and Sculptor

Art Times . . . I live here . . . close by the River Ericht

And now it is the end of March. So much is happening, so many new people to meet and to talk about the Ericht with, so much to learn about. Learning is an ongoing process for people, we have to learn to live, we have to learn to communicate and create, to make, to think and imagine how things can change or how to keep them the same (impossible). We learn whatever we do, we learn when we meet different people, we learn that they see a different world from our own, this includes the wide world around us as well as what is under our own nose. Not everyone appreciates wildness, wilderness, many cannot see beyond the undergrowth and what lives there, for some a tree is an obstruction and not a home for living things, not everyone appreciates maintained landscapes, many cannot see the green space around only what forms of life are missing.

I’m learning all this anew, not everyone sees the Ericht the way I do, as a refuge, a safe haven full of beauty. Because of this range of opinions I will say what I have learned from the people I speak to, but in this Creative Scotland funded role of Artist-in-Residence-in-My-Home-Blairgowrie I will maintain an objective distance. I will show what I see, I will not express personal opinions.

Meetings attended this month have included BRAN and then the Riverside Venture Group which is a sub group within Blairgowrie Community Council then one to one meetings with Jessie Shaw of One Voice and The Ericht Trust where I collected a Tascam sound recorder to borrow and record sounds along the river as well as interviews. I have volunteered to become their new interviewer for Blairgowrie Hour on Heartland FM so we’ll see how that pans out, Lesley McDonald from Cargill’s Bistro has a list of people she wants me to interview. I walked along the Ericht towards Kitty Swanson’s bridge with Hazel Harris and we spoke about how paths were vulnerable to landowners and farmers as well as the area’s history. Upcoming conversations include Melanie Thomson who will speak to me about the history of the mills along the Ericht’s banks and Louise Copeland who lives at the confluence of the Lornty Burn with the Ericht.

And Spring is coming . . .

Art Times Four

Art Times Four

Autumn drawing and other actions

Images above are from ‘Scratch Notes. . Volume 1’ miniature boxed installation shown at Perthshire Creates exhibition at Perth Museum and Art Gallery in October.

For me October overstayed its welcome and when time becomes like this my perception of the world hangs within a state of suspension where everything turns, rotates and orbits and the sun hangs too in the metalled gold or silver sky.

I have been looking at designers. Even now, almost 20 years after getting my degree in Fine Art Sculpture, I believe that dividing art into categories such as fine art and design is not helpful. For me anyone who thinks and imagines ways of doing things differently and then creates from their ideas is an artist – divisions are specious and a waste of time. For humans in this world to work together and share ideas should be the aim.

Bruce Mau, a Canadian designer (http://www.manifestoproject.it/bruce-mau) believes in creativity’s power to change our lives. I borrowed a book from the library called Glimmer by Warren Berger which discusses Bruce Mau’s and other designers’ influence on the everyday – how design is not about producing objects/gadgets of design – design is about processes of improving our experience of living in the world.  The book’s mantra is ‘ask stupid questions’ ask questions that don’t accept the way things are, ask why, ask what, ask who, where, when, how, whether, what about??? Too many of us don’t ask we simply behave. Stupid questions trigger fresh thinking. Another way to say this is ‘there is no such thing as a stupid question’.

Whatever we make, however we create, wherever we draw, sculpt, craft, part of all that exploratory process is getting lost (getting lost means we see/find/feel stuff we wouldn’t otherwise experience), and we make what we may consider to be mistakes (mistakes have a function), part of that process is to question our habits of making/doing and to DO DIFFERENTLY!

Which brings me to my new drawing class in Blairgowrie ‘Ways into Drawing’. I had forgotten how much I love to talk about drawing, to show others different ways to draw, to encourage experimentation. Not in a huge way, my aim is to encourage people who want to draw to play and relax, to have conversations, eat biscuits and drink tea and coffee . . .what is truly lovely is this is not about marks, passing exams, ticking boxes . . .it is simply about the process of mark making among like-minded people who are becoming friends. We’re just over half way through the block and I’m enjoying it enough to run another two groups that begin in January 2017. ‘Ways into Drawing One’ will repeat this current class and ‘Ways into Drawing Two’ will build and expand on ‘One’. I will use Create at Nest in Blairgowrie again as a venue, it’s small enough not to intimidate new people and it’s friendly. Bookings can be made via my website. Examples of the groups drawing can be seen below.

 

Finally . . . I have finished the wax sculpture commissioned privately for a Dandie Dimont and it will soon be cast in bronze. I am excited; the dog was interesting to model because he is small with short legs, a long muscular body and a curly coat. Dandie Dimont’s are a rare British breed, they do not cast their hair and so are good companions for people who are sensitive to dog hair. They were bred to be used for hunting badgers and their feet are amazing, when the dog is lying down they look dainty and small. When the dog stands up the foot spreads and look rather like a spade with claws stuck at the end. His body is concertina like – sometimes short and chunky – sometimes long and snake like. Their jaws have a bite which is fierce because they dislocate to get a grip on their prey. OUCH!

There’s so much more that happened but I’ve already written rather a lot so hey ho . . . so here’s a list Perthshire Creates exhibition at Perth Museum and Art Gallery, Scottish Woodworking Show 2016 at Brodies Timber in Inver by Dunkeld, Dr Isabella Moore CBE Director of Comtec talking to Women’s Enterprise at Cargills Bistro, The Care and Well-being Co-op event in Pitlochry where I held a Drawing for Well-being taster session, went to workshop about Sharing your creative practice held by Voluntary Arts Scoltand at the Botanic Cottage in Edinburgh’s Royal Botanic Garden and presented by Gill Thomas  and going to Growbiz Perthshire’s event about the mentoring process at Fishers Hotel in Pitlochry.

This week I will be concentrating on MAKING art.

Art Times Three – Fixing Things

“How does a project mature? It is obviously a most mysterious, imperceptible process. It carries on independently of ourselves, in the subconscious, crystallizing on the walls of the soul. It is the form of the soul that makes it unique, indeed only the soul decides the hidden ‘gestation period’ of that image which cannot be perceived by the conscious gaze”[1]

These words perfectly describes how I try to make art. . .

‘ nuff said. . .

Taking part in Perthshire Open Studios 2016 was a new experience for me, it emphasised that my previous experience of exhibiting – where ideas take precedence over selling art – was not helpful in this particular context. For eight days I answered questions from all kinds of people, some artists and some not, and by answering their questions I continued to learn a different way of saying what is necessary and leaving out what is not. Because it is true that many artists talk too much and use unhelpful, opaque and inaccessible language when talking about their art. See what I did there?

When I speak about art there is a conflict, it is very easy to say too much and overcomplicate things for the listener/observer, and they will walk away if they feel they don’t understand. I understand this. The naïve part of me rebels and feels that many other professions such as builders, engineers, mechanics, doctors, shop keepers, hardly ever have to explain in detail the stages of what they have done or why, it is enough that they have done it. They can fix what does not work or what is missing and VOILA! It is fixed – it works! (Or maybe not – but that is revealed at a later point in time if they have to explain why something has gone wrong). People generally consider all off these professions to be necessary and do not question why they need shelter, transport networks, cars, their own bodies or food, water and warmth.

Other professions such as teachers, nurses, social workers and, yes, artists, are constantly asked to explain what they do before they do it, while they are doing it and why – and are often told how they should do what they are trained to do by people who are not trained. I am not saying that people should not have an opinion BUT naïve me continues to be irritated by, for example, a neurosurgeon who notices how much a square slice of human brain under the microscope bears a resemblance to Kazimir Malevich’s Black Square 1913[2] then speaks about it at an international conference on design, exhibits it and  thus is accepted as a serious artist. Perhaps that is fair enough and yes, actually it is fair enough because, as Joseph Beuys said in 1972 at Documenta 5 “Everybody is an artist” [3] and I truly believe this. What bugs me though is this – if I walked into a hospital theatre where a neurosurgeon was performing an intricate operation and asked if I could have a go because I was a doctor of philosophy I know what the reaction would be.

And I certainly do not get paid as much for my art as a neurosurgeon does for their operating ability, even though my art includes science and their science requires artistic imagination which is a pre-requisite of ALL professions, and even though my formal art education lasted 10 years (not including school).  Art is still undervalued in our society and culture unless it is a commercial commodity (for a good example of increasing support for artists’ intrinsic value for everyone’s lives see https://www.a-n.co.uk/news/creative-scotland-arts-strategy-makes-commitment-to-fair-pay-for-artists). Art in retail outlets such as IKEA is more affordable and can be changed as often as furniture and interior decoration, and what artist hasn’t ever been asked if they can create something that ‘goes’ with a room in someone’s home? Does the consumer want something they never tire of looking at or something so disposable that they can throw it away with a clear conscience? (hopefully in the recycling bin)

That’s enough pontificating. I was asked interesting questions and some people were interested in what lies behind and within an artwork and how it emerges from the imagination. I listened to the other artists in the group and appreciated what they were saying, they had more experience than I of this particular environment. I did sell some work and I have a commission – I found that there is an enjoyable commercial element to my work which will hopefully begin to supply my bread and butter. What’s more it is art that means something to me since it reflects our love for others who are important to us.

[1] in Tarkovsky,A & Giovanni Chiaramonte; (2006); Instant light Tarkovsky Polaroids

[2] Basic biography see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kazimir_Malevich

[3] Basic explanation see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_sculpture

Art Time x Two (Short post)

Making art is a complex interplay of thought and action, of inaction and thought, of unthinking action, and  of physical inaction combined with thinking. To learn not to worry about this interplay takes practice, for some artists it takes a long time ( myself ) and for some artists it takes no time at all to be able to put such things in perspective. It is sixteen years since I graduated and the prospect of placing my work in the sights of other eyes still has the power to unnerve me, however there are more important things to consider. To continue being curious and asking why? What for? What is? Where can? To continue listening, seeing, feeling, touching, being – to continue making.

The five images of painting and sculpture above are ©Aileenmstackhouse2016

 on show during Perthshire Open Studios 2016 September 3 – 11. Venue 20 Spittalfield Hall Orange Route includes; artists Cornelia Weinmann, Mary Meldrum Brown, Graham Findlay, ceramicist Jenny Charles and makers Eileen Clason and David Downie which means that there will be a wide variety of art for sale.

 

 

Art Time

The sensation of time passing changes completely when I am physically involved in making art; sculpture; drawing; painting and any other form of creativity. I choose the word sensation rather than the word perception – I choose it since I exist within time and perception seems less descriptive of existing within time than sensation. To explain this statement and further confuse anyone who reads this – firstly –

Thinking about making art is as much making art as making art is                               

Thinking about making art is as much making art as making art is

Thinking about making art is as much making art as making art is

Thinking about making art is as much making art as making art is

I firmly believe this – it is not possible for me to physically make art all the time

Because – I stop being able to see what I have done

I stop being able to choose what to do next

I cannot find where to go next

I become lost

 

This is not a reason to stop thinking about making nor a reason to stop making

Reason tells me that even when I think I am lost I am still making.

 

Secondly –

Time which marks spaces between art making has no meaning in the place where art is made. This internal arena itself has no time, the place where art making takes place, its precise location is unknown and yet it is always present although sometimes inaccessible and always imprecise. Art making possesses an elastic quality in its propensity to stretch then contract experience – snapping back with rapid accelerations in the speed of decision making regarding the work – such speed makes it difficult to track where an idea springs from.

 

All this has re- emerged while I have been sorting what to put in SEVEN, our group exhibition in Spittalfield Village Hall (Venue 20) for Perthshire Open Studios 2016 from 3-11 September. Participating in exhibiting art brings associated tasks separate from making the thing itself. Talking with other artists, organising events, sharing ideas, collaboration and publicity (Social media, Radio and Press), printing and documentation, alongside the more mundane carrying, cleaning, driving, cleaning, measuring, cleaning, drilling, cleaning, hammering, cleaning, suspension, cleaning, polishing. . .is it ready yet???

 

 

See you at POS 2016 Spittalfield. . .

 

 

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